OMMM, A “MANTRA” FOR EFFECTIVE CHRISTIANITY

OMMM, not really a mantra, but an acrostic to pursue successful Christianity.

OBJECTIVE (needing to be objectified), CHRIST-LIKENESS (Rom. 8:29; Phil. 2:5; Gal. 2:20).

MOTIVATION, JESUS (Jn. 14:15, 23; I Cor. 5:14-15).

MATERIAL, SCRIPTURE (II Tim. 3:16-17; Jn. 17:17)

METHOD(S), CHRIST-IMITATED (Acts 1:1; I Cor. 11:1).

These create a synergistic effect that is powerful in the most extreme way. Jesus, however, must be the key in this energizing of Christianity. He must shape it, define it, motivate it, supply it, lead it, and serve as its model in every way!
This will work if we are willing to make the commitment. It is in fact, how Christianity is supposed to function (Rom. 8:29; I Cor. 2:10-16; II Cor. 3:18; Gal. 2:20, 4:19; Eph. 3:16-17; 4:11-16; Phil. 2:5; Col. 1:24-29; I Pet. 3:15, etc.).

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THE DANGER OF REDUCTIONISM IN CHRISTIANITY

A very unfortunate, but common, religious phenomenon is the gradual erosion of robust, rich, biblical conclusions leaving a reduced content inadequate to support truth. The bankruptcy created by this lazy reductionism disillusions those who find pseudo “reasons” inadequate. Additionally, such dilatory exegetical folly lends apparent support to those who would dismiss truth. Therefore, one of the most destructive forces against the acceptance of correct conclusions is an inadequate argument.
I Peter 3:15 reveals the solution needed to preserve substance and prevent a destructive slide into insufficiently supported assertions.
When our hearts give Jesus the most privileged place, our apologies have the force of Christ-likeness. We then share in the power of His complete, compelling, truthful embodiment of His Father’s will. Only in this way can we insure the vibrancy of Christianity. Reductionism cannot exist where Jesus lives!

HELPING IN TODAY’S CULTURAL CLIMATE

Helping people in need is imminently biblical. This is not even open for any rational discussion. Nevertheless, at the risk of being completely misunderstood, I want to address a matter of priority that seems to need clarification. I enter this post with caution, trepidation, and uneasiness, yet enter I will.

Though I am usually well behind most folks when trends dawn on me, eventually awareness makes its way into my head. Of late, a shift towards what was once styled the “Social Gospel” strikes me as an emphasis making a comeback. In the company of this return, I also sense a growing ascetic spirit floating around.

I get it that our culture in America is significantly materialistic and I also realize the need to do regular self-analyses to discover if I have become possessed by my possessions. As a Christian, these are not small matters. The Bible has much to say in this area. However, I think I see a baby headed out the window with its bath water in this one.

Maybe I am simply justifying that I have stuff. I have not sold my stuff to feed and house the unfortunate, though I have spent considerable time and money helping people in need. Not only that, I do not believe such a virtual total divesting of my stuff is supposed to be the defining mark of my Christianity. I do not believe Jesus came primarily to feed people and make them well. He could have done both of these things to every person in Judea, Samaria, and Galilee, but He did not. What He did do was preach and teach as many people as He could about matters tied to eternity.

Yes, we should share our blessings. A lack of compassion cannot walk in fellowship with the Good News about Jesus. Yet, the Great Commission is about salvation. Granted, compassion can and will open doors, but only the Gospel can open the doors of Hades to free its captives (Rev. 1:18). Well fed and housed lost people eventually die without Jesus (cf. Jn. 6:49).

I don’t intend to be guilted into a quick fix “Christianity” that either substitutes being kind for speaking a good word for Jesus or liquidating my possessions for proclaiming truth. I reiterate; Jesus saves! Churches are groups of people primarily in the business of growing in Christ-likeness so they may help the lost become saved.

I appreciate congregations, such as the one I attend, which have very well thought out assistance initiatives. But, pardon what may seem to some as mere self-justification, let Christians in their compassionate sharing be known without apology for talking to people about the Christ.

 

God’s Purpose for His People

Christianity and the Purposes of God

            A vital part of being transformed in our heart to be more like Jesus is found in knowing God’s purposes. In short, there is a plan. It is also true that an initial determination to be Christ-like may not result in discovering God’s plan. There are side roads and cul-de-sacs the evil one has created to take us off course.

            One of Satan’s most effective strategies is to have us accept some form of substitute Christianity. Substitutions often have a partial, though distorted representation of Jesus. Substitutions may do many good deeds and hold to various biblical positions; however, only Jesus’ church follows God’s purposes. God expects us to grow in our Christ-likeness to understand what Christianity truly means. This cannot be achieved apart from understanding God’s purposes for His people.

            Ephesians 4:11-16 is very instructive at this point. In just a few verses, a broad overview is given of how Christianity is designed to work. Applied to our day, teachers are to equip Christians with the tools they need to build up the body of Christ. The completed New Testament is the source of this equipping and it informs us fully relative to a mature understanding of Christ and His will.

            All Christians are charged with growing up individually and working together collectively. We are a body (I Cor. 12:12-27). Our identity is the identity of Jesus. We are to conduct the Father’s plan in the way of the Christ. In oneness and through love the church grows into a captivating, challenging body of believers (Jn. 13:34-35; 17:21-23). If we do not seek and employ God’s purposes, we will fall short of our Father’s expectations.

 

JESUS

Jesus, do we know Him? We know the Anglicized form of the Greek form of His Hebrew name, but do we know Him? To know Jesus is to understand both Him and the Father (Jn. 14:8-9). To know Him is to have His mind in us (Phil. 2:5). To know Him involves being conformed into His image (Rom. 8:29).

Do we know Jesus? When by reason of time have we seriously, faithfully become more of Him than of ourselves (Heb. 5:12-14; Gal. 2:20)? Has our life and all that is in it come to faithfully be seen through His eyes? Is our worldview increasingly His? Does our love for Him joined to His love for us result in the faithful following of His ways (Jn. 14:15; II Cor. 5:14-15)?

Do we know Jesus? Does our light shine in such a way as to give glory to God (Matt. 5:16)? Are our homes godly? Are the places we work more places of peace and harmony than they would be if we were not there to represent Jesus? Does the quality of our work reflect an excellence due to our service ultimately being given to Jesus (Col. 3:22-23)?

Do we know Jesus? Is He our friend because we give heed to His call (Jn. 15:14)? Is He our Lord through the practical expressions of our faith (Lk. 6:46; Matt. 7:21-23)? What is different about us because of Jesus? In our hearts, are we His? Where it really counts, are we His? We need to be sure of these things (II Cor. 13:5)! Knowing Jesus is inseparably tied to our eternal life (Jn. 17:3). Knowing Him is, therefore, the most serious thing in life. Do we know Jesus?

 

The Power of Love

The Power of Love in Speaking a Good Word for Jesus

As we consider how to approach friends and neighbors with the gospel of Christ, let us continually be mindful that we are not trying to win arguments, but rather secure hearts. Of course, we do need to prepare ourselves to present intelligent and compelling answers to their questions. The thing to remember, however, is that we will be distinguished by our love for others, our love for each other, and our love for Jesus (I Cor. 13:1-3; Jn. 13:34-35; 17:21-23).  Isn’t it amazing God saw fit to design a plan of salvation that would be most effectively communicated by the one thing each of us is capable of doing well?  Our ability to love is not limited by our intellect, our wealth, or our social standing; it is limited by our lack of concern for the needs of others.

Paul well understood this reality. He taught this truth arrestingly to the Corinthians who were obsessed with the idea of obtaining status by gaining miraculous gifts.  Today, in different ways, we may also be consumed with secondary pursuits. Such things may seem to be keys to improving our influence for Christ, but as at Corinth, absent our genuine love for people, we are just wasting our time.

While the dynamics governing the human heart may be elusive, they are nonetheless knowable.  Our hearts are not captured by people who are smarter, more athletic, or generally more successful than we are, our hearts are touched by small, sometimes insignificant, acts of kindness. Such things go unnoticed by many, but are treasured by the individuals who receive them.  As we improve our ability to communicate our Lord’s gospel, let’s not forget to continue to work on our ability to love.

“If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but do not have love, I have become a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal.  And if I have the gift of prophecy, and know all mysteries and all knowledge; and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing.  And if I give all my possessions to feed the poor, and if I deliver my body to be burned, but do not have love, it profits me nothing” (I Cor. 13:1-3).

The “Boredom” of Christianity

“I’m Bored”

In in the technology challenged era of my youth, I never though about being bored. I had more to do than I had time to do! Nevertheless, these are words every parent has heard from their children, especially during the long, hot months of summer. Although our children might think it is written in the official book of parenting that it is a parental obligation to keep their children entertained at all times, it is not. A fact in which we parents can take comfort. Nevertheless, we find ourselves challenged to respond to our children’s declaration of, “I’m bored”.

We know what boredom looks like on our child’s face, but what would boredom look like in a Christian’s life? Have you considered the possibility that we can grow bored as Christians? We know how to prevent our children from being bored; we give them something to do. How does God prevent His children from growing bored? He too, gives us something to do. Consider the words Paul pens to the Christians at Ephesus,

8For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, 9not of works, lest anyone should boast. 10For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand that we should walk in them. 

                                                                                        – Eph 2:8-10

While verse 8 reminds us that we cannot earn salvation, it is a gift of God, verse ten carries the meaning that we are made through a transformation in Christ for good works, which God has already planned for us, and desires that we continue to do them. Paul through out the book of Ephesians lists those works in which Christians should be involved. This list includes:

Becoming a dwelling place for God – 2:2

Making known the “manifold wisdom” of God through the church – 3:10

“… endeavoring to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.” – 4:3

“… equipping of the saints for the work of ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ,” – 4:12

“… speaking the truth in love” – 4:15

“… no longer walk as the rest of the Gentiles walk,” – 4:17

“… put on the new man which was created according to God,” – 4:21

“… kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another,” – 4:32

“… be imitators of God as dear children.”  -5:1

“Walk as children of light” – 5:8

“… have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather expose them – 5:11

“… understand what the will of the Lord is.”- 5:17

“… submitting to one another in the fear of God.” – 5:21

“… be strong in the Lord and in the power of His might.” – 6:10

“Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil.”– 6:11

While parents might not actively plan every moment of their child’s life, God has plans for every moment of our Christian life. His plans are challenging and they are exciting. If we have grown bored, or have never gotten excited about being a Christian, it’s time for an honest self-evaluation of our lives. Let us be on guard for boredom in our Christian lives.